Daily Bible Nugget #860, Romans 5:8

The Nugget:

Rom 5:8  But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. (KJV)

Rom 5:8 but God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. (ESV)

Rom 5:8 But God proves His love for us by the fact that Christ died for us while we were still sinners. (Williams NT)

Rom 5:8  Christ died for us while we were still sinners. This demonstrates God’s love for us. (GW, God’s Word translation)

Rom 5:8 But God has made clear his love to us, in that, when we were still sinners, Christ gave his life for us. (BBE, Bible in Basic English)

The Challenge:

“Not all the vials of judgment that have or shall be poured out upon the wicked world give such a demonstration of God’s hatred of sin as the wrath of God let loose upon his Son.” A. W. Pink

My Response:

This is a popular but very mistaken view of what transpired when Jesus was on the Cross.

Nowhere in the Bible is it stated that the wrath of God was let loose upon his Son.

Nowhere in the Bible does the Bible state that Jesus was punished for our sin.

Nowhere in the Bible does the Bible declare that Jesus paid the penalty for our sin.

If Jesus paid the penalty, to whom was the penalty paid? Chapter and Verse Please!

The words “penalty” and “paid” are nowhere in Scripture associated with the work Christ did on our behalf on the Cross, so far as I have been able to find using Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance to the Bible.

If it were true that Jesus suffered the wrath of God for us, that God the Father poured out His wrath upon His Son, that would divide the Trinity.

The thought is blasphemy, and not the Gospel presented in the New Testament.

As for the penalty for sin, God established just what that penalty was from the very beginning. The penalty is spiritual death.

Those who leave this life in the state of spiritual death will suffer for all eternity the punishment originally prepared for the Devil and his angels (Matthew 25:41).

Mat 25:41  Then shall he say also unto them on the left hand, Depart from me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire, prepared for the devil and his angels:

That dreadful punishment takes place in the Lake of Fire (Revelation 21:8).

Rev 21:8  But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death.

The more accurate view of the work of our Lord Jesus Christ is to affirm that he voluntarily (John 10:18) bore our sins (1 Peter 2:24) upon the Cross as both our Priest and the Sacrifice, thus Priestly-Sacrificial Atonement.

Joh 10:17  Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life, that I might take it again.
Joh 10:18  No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This commandment have I received of my Father.

1Pe 2:24  Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed.

He Himself is declared to be both the Sacrifice and the Atonement for our sin in 1 John 2:2, “And He, Himself, is Atonement concerning our sins; but not concerning ours only, but also concerning the world as a whole” (Lavender New Testament, translated by Dr. Malcolm Lavender).

What about 2 Corinthians 5:21? 

2Co 5:21  For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.

2 Corinthians 5:21 has been misunderstood and mistranslated in all of our English translations. Here is how this verse should be rendered:
“For the One not having experienced sin, He took sin in our behalf, in order that we might be made righteous by God in Him” (Lavender’s New Testament).
See the very important full grammatical explanation in the footnote to this verse on page 309 of the Lavender’s New Testament.
See further the notes I have placed at 2 Corinthians 5:21 in The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury.
This information can be found on this site by entering “2 Corinthians 5:21” in the search box  provided above by clicking on “Search Real Bible Study.”
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How to resolve differing Bible interpretations Part 5

 

The Text:

1Co 11:24  And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me.

1Co 11:25  After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me.

1Co 11:26  For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord’s death till he come.

The Challenge:

  1. 1 Corinthians 11:24-25 (Catholicism vs. Lutheranism): “This is my body… This cup is the new covenant in my blood…” Catholics believe in transubstantiation, where the bread and wine become Christ’s body and blood. Lutherans believe in consubstantiation, where Christ is present “in, with, and under” the elements but they do not change their substance.

My Comment:

We are never to do something, say something, or believe something in error (such as mistaken doctrines of false cults or mainline churches). We know a belief is in error when it contradicts the explicit teaching of Scripture.

A very touchy and sensitive application of this principle pertains to the Bible doctrines we choose to believe. Of course, if the doctrines are truly taught by the Bible, we certainly ought to believe them! But some widely believed doctrines are not taught by the Bible itself, but are mistaken understandings of what the Bible actually teaches.

In online discussions with one Jewish person in particular, I learned that the doctrine of Transubstantiation is a very serious stumbling block (1 Corinthians 8:9) that makes it most difficult for those who are Jews today and even in the past to possibly consider that Jesus Christ could be the Messiah or that Christianity is true because such a doctrine clearly contradicts what is written in the Hebrew Scriptures so it cannot possibly be true. And the Jews are right.

Jews consider the drinking of the wine, taught in some Christian churches to be the very blood of Jesus Christ, and the eating of the bread, taught in some Christian churches to be the very flesh of Jesus Christ, as nothing short of cannibalism. Jewish Scriptures (our Old Testament) clearly forbid such a practice as drinking blood (Leviticus 17:1112) and eating human flesh.

Christian churches that teach Transubstantiation and Consubstantiation–the “actual” or the “real” presence of Christ in the elements of the Lord’s Supper, Communion, or the Eucharist–are guilty of teaching and believing false doctrine, doctrine that serves as a stumbling block to bringing Jews to faith in the true Messiah, Jesus Christ. Belief in such false doctrine stems from the failure to understand some very frequently used figures of speech in the Bible, particularly the figure Metaphor. Jesus frequently employed the figure metaphor, as when He said “I am the door” (John 10:9). Does such a statement mean he has hinges and a door knob? Of course not.

So, when Jesus took bread and said, “Take, eat: this is my body” (Matthew 26:26), the is is metaphor, and means “this represents my body.” The proof is in the very context: they were not eating His actual flesh, for He was standing very much alive right before them; rather, they were eating bread, which symbolized His body.

So, when Jesus took the cup, and gave it to them, saying, “Drink ye all of it” (Matthew 26:27), adding “For this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins” (Matthew 26:28), once again we have the figure metaphor, signaled by the “is,” which therefore means “this represents my blood.” All the blood in the literal body of Jesus remained at that point as literal blood coursing through His veins; none of those present ever drank the actual blood of our Lord Jesus Christ, and neither has anyone else done so since.

The claim of some churches to miraculously transform the physical elements of bread and wine during the Eucharist or Communion or Lord’s Supper into the actual body and blood of Jesus Christ is a falsehood. This falsehood is a stumbling block, and you may be very sure that Christ did not intend anything He instituted or authorized to be a stumbling block to His own people, the Jews.

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Daily Bible Nugget #859, Ephesians 6:18

 

The Nugget:

Eph 6:18  Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit, and watching thereunto with all perseverance and supplication for all saints;

From Ken Sagely’s Facebook Post:

Walk in The Light: Unceasing Prayer

Jeremiah 33.3
Call unto me, and I will answer thee, and show thee great and mighty things, which thou knowest not.

John 14.13
And whatsoever ye shall ask in my name that will I do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son.

Romans 8.26
Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should  pray for as he ought, but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered.

Philippians 4.4-7
Rejoice in the Lord alway: and again I say, Rejoice. v 5 Let your moderation be  known unto all men. The Lord is at hand,
6 Be Anxious for Nothing but in everything by Prayer and Supplication with Thanksgiving let your requests be made unto God.
7 And the Peace of God, which Passeth all Understanding, will Keep your Hearts and Minds through Christ Jesus.

1 John 5.14-15
And this is the confidence that we have in him, that, if we ask anything according to his will, he heareth us:
15 And if we know that he hear us, whatsoever we ask, we know that we have  the petitions that we desired of him.

(Effective Unceasing prayer actually means living continually in fellowship and nearness to God.

George Mueller said, “I live in the spirit of prayer, I pray as I walk, when I lay down, and when I arise. The answers are always coming.”

We are to be “instant in prayer.” In every moment of crisis and blessing we pour out our hearts to Him in swift, fervent sentences, “Lord, help me here.” “Lord I see your gracious hand, thank you.” )

Ephesians 6.18
And pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayer and requests.  With this in mind, be alert and always keep on praying for all the saints.

Dig deeper by reading and studying the cross references for Ephesians 6:18 as they are given in The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury:

 Ephesians 6:18
Praying. Gr. proseuchomai (S# G4336). Restricted to prayer to God in the NT (CB, Appendix 134,I.2, p. 164). Mat 5:44 g. +*Mat 6:9 g. Gen 13:4, Luk 18:1 g. Col 1:3 g, Col 1:9 g. 1Th 5:17 g. 1Ti 2:8 g. Jud 1:20 g.

always. or, on every occasion. FS147D, +Gen_1:29. Eph 1:16, +*1Sa 12:23, Neh 2:4, Job 27:10, Psa 35:22; Psa 55:16, 17; Psa 73:28; *Psa 86:3; *Psa 86:6; Psa 109:4; Psa 116:2, Isa 26:16, +*Dan 6:10, Mat 6:5, *Luk 2:26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32; **Luk 2:37; Luk 3:26, 27; *+Luk 18:1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; +*Luk 21:36, Act 1:14; Act 2:42; *Act 6:4; Act 9:11; Act 10:2; Act 10:9; Act 12:5, Rom 1:9; *Rom 12:12, **Php 4:6, Col 1:9; *Col 4:2, 1Th 3:10; +*1Th 5:17, 1Ti 5:5, 2Ti 1:3.

all prayer. FS93A, +Gen 1:26. By Hendiadys, “supplicating prayer.” T1307.

supplication. Gr. deēsis (S# G1162, 1Ti 2:1). 1Ki 8:52; 1Ki 8:54; 1Ki 8:59; 1Ki 9:3, Est 4:8, Dan 9:3; Dan 9:20, Hos 12:4, Mat 18:19, Luk 22:40, +*1Ti 2:1, Heb 5:7.

in the. T1410: Eph 2:22, Zec 12:10, *Joh 4:23; *Joh 4:24, Act 2:4; Act 9:31, +*Rom 8:15; +Rom 8:26; Rom 8:27, 1Co 14:15, Gal 4:6, Php 3:3, **Jud 1:20.

Spirit. Gr. pneuma, +Mat 3:16. Eph 2:18.

watching. Literally, lying sleepless. *Mat 26:41, Mar 1:35; *Mar 13:33; Mar 14:34; Mar 14:38, +**Luk 21:36; Luk 22:46, 1Co 16:13, *Col 4:2, 1Th 5:6, Heb 13:17, *1Pe 4:7.

all perseverance. Gen 18:29; Gen 18:31; *Gen 32:24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, =Exo 17:11; =Exo 17:12, 1Sa 1:12, 1Ki 18:43, **Job 1:5, Mat 15:25, 26, 27, 28; Mat 17:21, Mar 10:48, Luk 11:5, 6, 7, 8; Luk 18:1, 2, 3,, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, +Act 1:14.

and. FS93A, +Gen 1:26.

supplication. See on Eph 6:19, Eph 1:16; Eph 3:8; Eph 3:18, Mar 9:29, Act 12:5, 2Co 1:11, Php 1:4; Php 1:19, Col 1:4, 1Ti 2:1; 1Ti 5:5, Phm 1:5, 1Pe 3:7.

all saints. Eph 1:15, Act 9:13, +2Co 1:1.

 

 

 

 

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Daily Bible Nugget #858, Psalm 119:11

 

The Nugget:

Psalm 119:11  Thy word have I hid in mine heart, that I might not sin against thee.

The Challenge:

Ask any Muslim, regardless of race, to recite surahs (not verses) from the Quran. Then, try asking any Christian to recite several verses only from the Gospel in Greek (or even in English).

My Comments:

[Dean Crossley presented the full chart of the conjugation of the Greek verb for “loose” to show how the Greek verb in its various forms very precisely conveys the type of action intended as a comparison to Arabic in a discussion of which language was superior for communicating truth most accurately to the widest audience.]

l had to learn those conjugations and much more by heart when I took two years of New Testament Greek at Bob Jones University. I have been studying Greek ever since and have much more to learn, though. I only know of two English translations of the Greek NT which properly render the subjunctive mood (and the middle voice) consistently and adequately into English [Young’s Literal Translation and the Lavender New Testament]. This has a most important bearing on understanding Bible doctrine!

As for memorization, my elderly friend, Uncle Frank Burrell, who lived in the Grand Hotel which was next to my apartment building on Fort Street, about eight blocks west of the Ambassador Bridge, in southwest Detroit, had lived in the same hotel room since 1920 when I first met him in 1963 or 1964. He had retired from Kelvinator in 1950. Uncle Frank had memorized the entire New Testament in English. He told me he did that so he could discuss the Bible with others without having to turn through the printed pages of the Bible. He knew the Old Testament nearly as well. He was an expert in the types of the Old Testament, especially the Tabernacle. I inherited his library.

Many people have memorized the entire Bible or the entire New Testament.

If Uncle Frank could do this as an ordinary blue collar factory worker out of personal interest, it is not unreasonable to believe many other Christians have done the same.

PixelMistakePicasso asked:

May I ask which version of the Bible your friend memorized? It’s important to note that your friend didn’t memorize “the Bible” in its original form; they memorized an English translation of it. When it comes to the Quran, it was originally revealed in Arabic, and Muslims memorize it in Arabic, word for word. This means that regardless of any translations into different languages, Muslims still retain the original Arabic version in their memory. This practice ensures that no one can intentionally or unintentionally alter even a single word of the Quran, even after thousands of years. The memorization of the Quran is a means of preserving it as the Final Revelation from God, since there will be no subsequent revelation to correct any corruption if it were to occur. While the Gospel (Injeel) revealed to Jesus or the Torah given to Moses could have been corrupted, it is understandable because they are not the final revelations. This is why God did not promise in the Torah or the Injeel that those texts would be protected from alteration.

this is one example why memorization is important in preservation.

“He led the team to victory” vs. “He let the team to victory.”

Changing “led” to “let” alters the meaning significantly.

My answer:

My friend Uncle Frank memorized the Bible as I described above in English, in the King James Version.

Remember that you said in your comment above, “or even in English.”

My elderly friend was still studying NT Greek and Greek grammar clear into his mid eighties.

Though he was just a blue collar factory worker in Detroit at Kelvinator (a manufacturer of wood burning cookstoves–my grandparents in North Dakota had that brand of stove in their farmhouse), he certainly knew his Bible well.

He was an expert on the subject of baptism. In his younger days he debated Baptists on the issue of the mode of baptism. No one could defeat him on this subject in a debate!

Dean Crossley’s response to PixelMistakePicasso:

I don’t think you fully grasp the point that Ehrman was making when he emphasized the importance of written evidence to prove that what is being recited today in the 21st century is the same as that of the 7th.

Please re-read that section from Ehrman:

“”Unless the text is written down someplace, there is no way actually to *check* to see. So unless you have WRITTEN evidence that goes back to the seventh century (in this case), there is no way to know. That’s why such manuscript discoveries are important.”

My response to Dean Crossley:

There was a sign prominently displayed on the school security office door at Denby High School in Detroit, Michigan at the time I was a teacher there.

The sign read:

IF IT IS NOT WRITTEN, IT DID NOT HAPPEN.

 

Dig deeper into what God’s Word teaches for Psalm 119:11 by carefully studying the cross references given for this verse in The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury:

Psalms 119:11
Thy word. [Heb. imrah, S# H565. Psa 119:38; Psa 119:41; Psa 119:50; Psa 119:58; Psa 119:67; Psa 119:76; Psa 119:82; Psa 119:103; Psa 119:116; Psa 119:123; Psa 119:133; Psa 119:140; Psa 119:148; Psa 119:154; Psa 119:158; Psa 119:162; Psa 119:170; Psa 119:172, Gen 4:23 (speech). Psa 12:6 (the only place where the plural is found)] *Psa 119:97; Psa 119:105; Psa 119:125, **Psa 1:2; **Psa 37:31; *Psa 40:8, Deut 6:6; Deut 11:18; Deut 32:46, *Job 22:22; **Job 23:12, *Pro 2:1; Pro 2:10; Pro 2:11, Isa 51:7, **Jer 15:16; Jer 20:9, Luk 2:19; Luk 2:51, +*Joh 5:38; Joh 5:39, **Col 3:16, 1Jn 2:14.

hid. T1070 (The Scriptures to be: Laid up in the heart), T1088 (Saints hide Scripture in their hearts). Psa 119:16; Psa 119:98, +Deut 6:6; Deut 11:18, **Jos 1:8, 1Sa 21:12, Jer 31:33, Eze 3:3, Luk 8:15, 2Co 3:3.

in mine heart. Psa 37:31; Psa 40:8, Deut 6:6; Deut 11:18, 1Sa 21:12, Pro 3:1; Pro 3:3; Pro 4:4; Pro 16:23, Eze 3:10, Dan 7:28, Mat 12:35, Luk 1:66; Luk 6:45; Luk 8:15, Joh 15:7, 1Jn 2:14; 1Jn 2:24, 3Jn 1:3.

that I. Psa 119:16; Psa 119:125; Psa 119:133; Psa 119:165, Psa 18:21, 22, 23; *Psa 19:11; Psa 19:13, Deut 4:9, Jos 24:22, 1Ch 28:8, Neh 13:3, Pro 3:23; Pro 6:22, **+Joh 8:11 note. +*Joh 17:6; Joh 17:17, +**1Co 15:34, Eph 6:17, 18, +*2Ti 3:16.

 

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Daily Bible Nugget #857, James 2:24

 

The Nugget:

Jas 2:24  Ye see then how that by works a man is justified, and not by faith only.

My Comment:

This is Part 4 of How to resolve differing interpretations of the Bible.

The Challenge:

  1. James 2:24 (Catholicism vs. Protestantism): “You see that a person is justified by works and not by faith alone.” Catholics cite this to support the necessity of faith and works for salvation, contrasting many Protestant views that emphasize salvation by faith alone.

My Response:

Reading James 2:24 in its immediate context shows that James is writing of faith as it can be seen by men:

Jas 2:18  Yea, a man may say, Thou hast faith, and I have works: shew me thy faith without thy works, and I will shew thee my faith by my works.

How can others see that you have faith? They see your faith by observing how you live.

Earlier in James chapter 2, James has stressed that it is impossible to keep the whole law:

Jas 2:10  For whosoever shall keep the whole law, and yet offend in one point, he is guilty of all.

Therefore, no one can keep the Law of God perfectly enough to merit eternal life.

Thus, anyone who depends upon their supposedly good works to merit eternal life is still lost in their sins and is not saved.

Therefore, the Roman Catholic view that works are necessary for salvation is absolutely mistaken.

Those who have true faith in God and our Lord Jesus Christ experience the new birth, the birth from above, and are born again (John 3:3, 7):

Joh 3:3  Jesus answered and said unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.

Joh 3:7  Marvel not that I said unto thee, Ye must be born again.

False religions and false cults mistakenly believe that they are born again when they are water baptized. They make this claim by misreading John 3:5.

Joh 3:5  Jesus answered, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God.

John 3:5 is not a reference to ritual water baptism but a reference to real baptism by the Holy Spirit which takes place when you place your faith for salvation in our Lord Jesus Christ in accordance with His promise:

Joh 5:24  Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life.

Those who have experienced the real baptism by the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 12:13) which results from believing what God has said in His written word (1 Thessalonians 2:13) found in the Bible will produce the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22-25).

1Co 12:13  For by one Spirit are we all baptized into one body, whether we be Jews or Gentiles, whether we be bond or free; and have been all made to drink into one Spirit.

1Th 2:13  For this cause also thank we God without ceasing, because, when ye received the word of God which ye heard of us, ye received it not as the word of men, but as it is in truth, the word of God, which effectually worketh also in you that believe.

Gal 5:22  But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith,
Gal 5:23  Meekness, temperance: against such there is no law.
Gal 5:24  And they that are Christ’s have crucified the flesh with the affections and lusts.
Gal 5:25  If we live in the Spirit, let us also walk in the Spirit.

The Roman Catholic view that salvation is dependent upon our works is therefore mistaken. Salvation is based upon believing who Jesus is, believing that God sent Him, and believing the gracious promise of Jesus to receive the gift of eternal life that only He can offer (John 17:2). A works-based salvation rather than a faith-based salvation that results in genuine regenerative change (Titus 3:5) is a rejection of the gift God has promised and a substitution of a man-made, not Bible based, plan of salvation which will lead to the eternal loss of those who mistakenly embrace it (John 10:1, 7).

Joh 17:2  As thou hast given him power over all flesh, that he should give eternal life to as many as thou hast given him.

Tit 3:5  Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost;

Joh 10:1  Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that entereth not by the door into the sheepfold, but climbeth up some other way, the same is a thief and a robber.

Joh 10:7  Then said Jesus unto them again, Verily, verily, I say unto you, I am the door of the sheep.

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Daily Bible Nugget #856, Ephesians 2:8

 

The Nugget:

Eph 2:8  For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God:
Eph 2:9  Not of works, lest any man should boast.
Eph 2:10  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them.

The Controversy:

  1. Ephesians 2:8-9 (Lutheranism vs. Catholicism): “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God—not by works, so that no one can boast.” Lutherans emphasize salvation by faith alone, while Catholics hold that faith must be accompanied by good works.

The Correct Resolution:

“Catholics hold that faith must be accompanied by good works.”

The Bible plainly teaches that we cannot be saved by our own good works.

Titus 3:5
5  Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost;
King James Version

2 Timothy 1:9
9  Who hath saved us, and called us with an holy calling, not according to our works, but according to his own purpose and grace, which was given us in Christ Jesus before the world began,
King James Version

The Bible teaches that we are saved by faith alone.

John 5:24
24  Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life.
King James Version

What Roman Catholics and many others fail to understand is that when a person is genuinely saved, the Holy Spirit indwells each believer and produces the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22-25).

Gal 5:22  But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith,
Gal 5:23  Meekness, temperance: against such there is no law.
Gal 5:24  And they that are Christ’s have crucified the flesh with the affections and lusts.
Gal 5:25  If we live in the Spirit, let us also walk in the Spirit.

Genuine faith produces works pleasing to God by means of the Holy Spirit in us Who produces the fruit of the Spirit.

Where does saving faith come from?

Romans 10:17
17  So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God.
King James Version

Genuine Christians are only those who continue to hear the word of God. The word of God is found only in the Bible. Not only must we continue to hear the word of God but we must continue to obey the word of God. To do this we must continue to feed ourselves spiritually by reading and carefully studying the Bible.

2Ti 2:15  Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth.

Mat 4:4  But he answered and said, It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God.

The word Jesus explicitly refers to is the written word as it is found in the Bible.

Deuteronomy 8:3
3  And he humbled thee, and suffered thee to hunger, and fed thee with manna, which thou knewest not, neither did thy fathers know; that he might make thee know that man doth not live by bread only, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the LORD doth man live.
King James Version

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Daily Bible Nugget #855, Matthew 16:18

The Nugget:

Mat 16:18  And I say also unto thee, That thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.

The Challenge:

  1. Matthew 16:18 (Roman Catholicism vs. Protestantism): “And I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not overcome it.” Catholics interpret this as Jesus establishing Peter as the first pope, a foundational argument for the papal authority. Protestants typically interpret “this rock” as Peter’s faith or Jesus himself, rejecting the Catholic doctrine of papal succession.

My Comment:

This Post could have been titled “How to Resolve Differing Interpretations of the Bible Part 2.”

Roman Catholics regard this verse (Matthew 16:18) as Jesus establishing Peter as the first Pope. The evidence in the New Testament shows this is not the case. This passage furnishes no foundational argument for papal authority for those who are able to read the New Testament for themselves, for no such office is even hinted at in the Bible itself. The doctrine of papal succession is not to be found in the Bible. These are doctrines of men imposed upon Scripture long after the fact.

The Answer as I have given it in The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury and The New Treasury of Scripture Knowledge:

Peter. Gr. Petros. i.e. a stone, a piece of rock, loose and movable, *S# G4074.

This important incident recorded most fully here in Matthew does not seem to be understood by the apostles as giving any primacy or special authority to Peter, for just a short time later they are arguing about who should be greatest in the Kingdom (Mat 18:1 note. Mat 20:21-24).

Matthew 18:1 Notes:
At the same time. Mat 17:24, **Mar 9:33, 34, 35, 36, 37.

Who. That such a controversy as this could repeatedly occur shows both the humanity of the apostles, and most forcibly, that Peter was not understood by the rest of the apostles to have the primacy among them, for they obviously did not so understand our Lord’s words to Peter in Mat 16:18, 19. **Mat 20:20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28; Mat 23:11, Mar 9:34; Mar 10:35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, Luk 9:46, 47, 48; Luk 22:24, 25, 26, 27, Rom 12:10, Php 2:3.

greatest. FS96E4, +Mat 13:32. Note—This question, no doubt, was suggested by the vision in the preceding chapter, and the selection of the three disciples to witness it; as intimated by the words At the same time; in which view it confirms the application of that scene to the Second Advent. As to different degrees of glory in the kingdom of Christ see Mat 10:41; Mat 16:27; Mat 19:28; Mat 20:23, Luk 19:17; Luk 19:19; +*Luk 14:14, 1Co 15:40, 41 with Dan 12:2, 3, Rev 2:25, 26, 27, 28; Rev 20:4. Compare also 1Co 3:8; 1Co 3:14 with 2Jn 1:8 (William De Burgh, New Marginal Readings and References to the Gospels, p. 86). Mat 18:4, Mat 5:19, 20; Mat 23:11; +Mat 23:12, Act 8:19, +*Rom 12:3; +*Rom 12:16.

in. Mat 3:2; Mat 5:19, 20; Mat 7:21, Mar 10:14, 15.

kingdom of heaven. +Mat 4:17; +*Mat 5:3; Mat 6:9, 10; *Mat 20:21, *Act 1:6.

Mat 20:21  And he said unto her, What wilt thou? She saith unto him, Grant that these my two sons may sit, the one on thy right hand, and the other on the left, in thy kingdom.
Mat 20:22  But Jesus answered and said, Ye know not what ye ask. Are ye able to drink of the cup that I shall drink of, and to be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with? They say unto him, We are able.
Mat 20:23  And he saith unto them, Ye shall drink indeed of my cup, and be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with: but to sit on my right hand, and on my left, is not mine to give, but it shall be given to them for whom it is prepared of my Father.
Mat 20:24  And when the ten heard it, they were moved with indignation against the two brethren.

upon. Mat 7:24, =Exo 40:8; =Exo 40:18, =Psa 87:1; Psa 87:5, Pro 10:25, Isa 14:32; *Isa 28:16, Dan 2:34, 1Co 3:9, 10, 11, Gal 2:9, Eph 2:19, 20, 21, 22, **1Pe 2:4; **1Pe 2:5, Rev 21:14.

this. Very emphatic, as though pointing to Himself. One of three important passages where “this” stands for the speaker (CB). **Joh 2:19; *Joh 6:58.

rock. Gr. petra, immovable rock. FS22L3, +Deut 32:31, FS135, +Psa 68:28, Gr. Petra. What is the “rock” upon which Christ will build His church? Greek grammar is against “rock” referring to Peter, for “Peter” is masculine gender, while “rock” is neuter gender. Some counter, however, that such nice distinctions in the Greek were not made in the Aramaic, the language which Jesus actually spoke. The fact that there are such nice distinctions in the Greek at numerous points as seen by the figure of speech Paronomasia (FS140, +Gen 4:25), as at Mat 21:41; Mat 22:3; Mat 24:7; shows that Matthew was originally written in Greek, and is not a translation from the Aramaic. No less an authority than Nigel Turner cites this very distinction (Petros, petra) as evidence that Jesus on this occasion spoke in Greek, not Aramaic (Grammatical Insights, p. 181; Grammar of N.T. Greek, vol. iv. p. 38), and that Matthew’s gospel was originally written in Greek, and is not a translation from the Aramaic. The “rock” may be the truth of Peter’s confession, the faith which underlies the confession [agreeing with homologia, which is Feminine, and is rendered confession in 1Ti 6:13, and profession in 1Ti 6:12, Heb 3:1; Heb 4:14; Heb 10:23, Compare 2Co 9:13, Peter’s confession is the foundation to which Christ referred, and not Peter himself. He was neither the foundation nor the builder—(a poor builder, Mat 16:23)—but Christ alone, whom he had confessed (1Co 3:11), CB], or it may be a reference to Christ himself. The latter view seems to be favored by the reference passages. *Mat 7:24, 25, 26, 27, +*Deut 32:4, 2Sa 22:2, Job 30:6, *Psa 18:2; Psa 27:5; **Psa 118:22; Psa 125:1, **Isa 28:16, Jer 4:29, 1Co 3:9, 10, 11; **1Co 10:4, *Eph 2:20, 21, 22, Col 1:18, 1Pe 2:4, 5, 6, Rev 21:14.

I will build. Gr. oikodomeō (S# G3618, Mat 7:24). This verb is first person singular, future tense, active voice, indicative mood. Since the tense of this verb is future, some understand the founding of Christ’s church as future to this time of his speaking. If this is the correct understanding, then the church of the New Testament is distinct from the church of the Old Testament. Others, however, believe that the church is one in both Testaments, though in the Old Testament the church is national, in the New Testament it is universal. In support of the latter view, the church in Mat 18:17 is spoken of as already existing, not future. Various titles and expressions in the New Testament show the church to be in both Testaments (Act 7:38; Rom 11:17, 18, 19, 20, 21; 1Co 3:16, 17; 2Co 6:16; Eph 2:11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16; Eph 2:21; Gal 4:26; Heb 12:22). Note—The emblem of a building is sometimes used in Scripture to denote the whole church, including Christ as the chief corner-stone,—the body of which he is the head: but in other places, as here, the church only; Christ being represented as the Builder (see the references). So likewise a foundation has two senses: the first, the support of the building, in which sense it applies to the apostles generally (Eph 2:20, Rev 21:14), and to Peter in particular; for (as remarked by Bishop Pearson on the Creed), “the promise made here was punctually fulfilled, by Christ’s using Peter’s ministry in laying the foundation of the Christian church among both Jews and Gentiles; and in his being the first preacher to them of that faith which he here confesses, and making the first proselytes to it; for St. Peter laid the first foundation of a church among the Jews, by the conversion of 3000 souls (Act 2:41), who, when they gladly had embraced St. Peter’s doctrine, were all baptized; and then (Act 2:47), we find mention of a Christian Church. St. Peter also laid the first foundation of a church among the Gentiles, by the conversion of Cornelius and his friends, Acts 10,” To which it should be added that Peter was the first called to apostleship, and the first to whom it was given to make this full confession of the Christian faith; at the same time that it is evident that the precedence in no one of these particulars could be successive, or belong to any other than the apostle himself (De Burgh, p. 79, 80). =1Ki 7:21; 1Ki 15:4, =2Ch 4:4, Psa 147:2, Pro 9:1, Hos 1:10; Hos 2:23, +*Zec 6:12; +*Zec 6:13, 1Co 3:9, **Gal 2:9, Heb 3:3, 4, **1Pe 2:4; **1Pe 2:5.

my. Mat 18:17, Act 2:47; Act 8:1, Eph 2:20; Eph 3:10; **Eph 5:25, 26, 27; **Eph 5:32, **Col 1:18, 1Ti 3:5; 1Ti 3:15, Heb 3:6.

church. Gr. ekklēsia (S# G1577, Heb 2:12). Deut 18:16, Jos 8:35, 1Ki 8:14, Psa 22:22; Psa 22:25, Joh 10:3, 4; Joh 10:14, 15, 16, Act 7:38; %Act 19:32; %Act 19:39; %Act 19:41 g. +*Act 20:28, Rom 9:25, 26, 27; Rom 11:17, 18, 19, 20, 21; Rom 16:16, 1Co 3:16, 17; 1Co 11:16, 2Co 6:16, Gal 4:26, Eph 1:22; Eph 2:11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16; Eph 2:21; Eph 4:15, 16, +*1Ti 3:15 note. Tit 2:14, Heb 10:21; Heb 12:22, 1Pe 2:9.

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How to resolve differing interpretations of the Bible Part 1

 

The Text:

2Pe 3:17  Ye therefore, beloved, seeing ye know these things before, beware lest ye also, being led away with the error of the wicked, fall from your own stedfastness. (KJV)

2Pe 3:17 So, dearly beloved, since you have been forewarned, you must always be on your guard against being led astray by the errors of lawless men, and so against falling away from your present firmness; (Williams NT)

2Pe 3:17  Dear friends, you already know these things. So be on your guard not to be carried away by the deception of people who have no principles. Then you won’t fall from your firm position. (GW, God’s Word translation)

2Pe 3:17  My dear friends, you have been warned ahead of time! So don’t let the errors of evil people lead you down the wrong path and make you lose your balance. (CEV, Contemporary English Version)

The Challenge:

“and yet you still quote from the Bible, which every Christian denomination interprets differently”

My Response:

Your statement:

“and yet you still quote from the Bible, which every Christian denomination interprets differently”

is a rather broad overstatement and over-generalization. Bible believing Christians are more in agreement than disagreement. Where there is disagreement, following the rules of interpretation I have shared with you will usually establish the correct interpretation of the Bible.

If you think not, please provide a specific example of a text of the Bible upon which Bible believing Christians are known to disagree, and I may be able to furnish you an example of how applying the rules of interpretation work to resolve such differences.

 

Reply to Me with a Helpful List of Verses:

  1. Matthew 16:18 (Roman Catholicism vs. Protestantism): “And I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not overcome it.” Catholics interpret this as Jesus establishing Peter as the first pope, a foundational argument for the papal authority. Protestants typically interpret “this rock” as Peter’s faith or Jesus himself, rejecting the Catholic doctrine of papal succession.
  2. Ephesians 2:8-9 (Lutheranism vs. Catholicism): “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God—not by works, so that no one can boast.” Lutherans emphasize salvation by faith alone, while Catholics hold that faith must be accompanied by good works.
  3. James 2:24 (Catholicism vs. Protestantism): “You see that a person is justified by works and not by faith alone.” Catholics cite this to support the necessity of faith and works for salvation, contrasting many Protestant views that emphasize salvation by faith alone.
  4. 1 Corinthians 11:24-25 (Catholicism vs. Lutheranism): “This is my body… This cup is the new covenant in my blood…” Catholics believe in transubstantiation, where the bread and wine become Christ’s body and blood. Lutherans believe in consubstantiation, where Christ is present “in, with, and under” the elements but they do not change their substance.
  5. Acts 2:38 (Pentecostals vs. Baptists): “Repent and be baptized, every one of you, in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins. And you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.” Pentecostals emphasize baptism in the Holy Spirit with the evidence of speaking in tongues, whereas Baptists emphasize baptism as a symbol of professing faith.
  6. 1 Timothy 2:12 (Egalitarian vs. Complementarian denominations): “I do not permit a woman to teach or to assume authority over a man; she must be quiet.” This verse has sparked debates over women’s roles in church leadership, with egalitarian denominations allowing women pastors, while complementarian ones do not.
  7. Romans 9:13-18 (Calvinism vs. Arminianism): “Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated…” Calvinists use this passage to support the doctrine of unconditional election and predestination. Arminians argue for conditional election based on God’s foreknowledge of faith.
  8. 1 Corinthians 14:34-35 (Egalitarian vs. Complementarian denominations): “Women should remain silent in the churches. They are not allowed to speak…” Similar to 1 Timothy 2:12, this verse affects the interpretation of women’s roles in the church.
  9. Matthew 28:19 (Trinitarian vs. Oneness Pentecostalism): “Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.” Trinitarians use this to affirm the doctrine of the Trinity, whereas Oneness Pentecostals advocate for baptism in Jesus’ name only, rejecting traditional Trinitarian formulas.
  10. Revelation 20:1-6 (Premillennialism vs. Amillennialism): Descriptions of a thousand-year reign of Christ are taken literally by Premillennialists, while Amillennialists interpret them symbolically or metaphorically.
  11. Hebrews 6:4-6 (Calvinism vs. Arminianism): “It is impossible for those who have once been enlightened… if they fall away, to be brought back to repentance…” Calvinists interpret this as a warning to non-elect, while Arminians see it as a possibility of apostasy.
  12. Acts 10:44-48 (Baptists vs. Pentecostals): “While Peter was still speaking these words, the Holy Spirit came on all who heard the message.” Pentecostals see this as a normative pattern for receiving the Holy Spirit post-conversion, while Baptists view it as unique to the early church.
  13. Titus 3:5 (Catholicism vs. Protestantism): “He saved us, not because of righteous things we had done, but because of his mercy…” This verse supports the Protestant emphasis on salvation by grace, not by works, contrasting Catholic views.
  14. John 6:53-56 (Catholicism vs. Protestantism): “Unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you…” Catholics see this as support for the doctrine of the Eucharist; many Protestants interpret it symbolically.
  15. Ephesians 4:11-12 (Charismatics vs. Cessationists): “So Christ himself gave the apostles, the prophets, the evangelists, the pastors and teachers…” Charismatics believe in the ongoing gifts of prophecy and tongues, while Cessationists believe these gifts ceased with the apostolic age.
  16. Romans 5:12-19 (Original Sin – Augustine vs. Pelagius): This passage discusses the doctrine of original sin, which Augustine championed, arguing that all humans inherited sin from Adam. Pelagius denied this, claiming each soul is created pure by God.
  17. Matthew 5:32 (Various denominations on divorce): “But I tell you that anyone who divorces his wife, except for sexual immorality, makes her the victim of adultery…” This verse impacts differing views on the permissibility and conditions for divorce.
  18. 2 Timothy 3:16-17 (Sola Scriptura advocates vs. Tradition-oriented denominations): “All Scripture is God-breathed…” Proponents of Sola Scriptura argue that the Bible alone is the ultimate authority, contrasting with denominations like Catholicism that also hold to sacred tradition.
  19. Luke 14:26 (Literal vs. metaphorical interpretations): “If anyone comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters—yes, even their own life—such a person cannot be my disciple.” The interpretation of “hate” here varies, influencing views on discipleship.
  20. 1 Peter 3:21(Baptismal regeneration – Lutheranism vs. Baptist): “Baptism, which corresponds to this, now saves you…” Lutherans believe in baptismal regeneration, the idea that baptism imparts grace and saves, while Baptists view baptism as a symbolic act following salvation.

And Another List of Controversial Verses:

  1. John 20:23 (Catholicism vs. Protestantism): “If you forgive anyone’s sins, their sins are forgiven; if you do not forgive them, they are not forgiven.” Catholics interpret this as Jesus granting the apostles—and by extension, priests—the authority to forgive sins, supporting the practice of confession. Most Protestants see this as a general call to proclaim forgiveness through the gospel.
  2. 1 Corinthians 7:15 (Views on Divorce and Remarriage): “But if the unbeliever leaves, let it be so. The brother or the sister is not bound in such circumstances; God has called us to live in peace.” This verse is pivotal in discussions about the legitimacy of divorce and remarriage, especially within evangelical circles compared to more conservative denominations.
  3. Romans 13:1-7 (Political Engagement): “Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities…” This passage is often debated regarding the extent of Christian submission to government and involvement in political activism, particularly between Anabaptists who advocate for separation from state affairs and other groups that promote civic engagement.
  4. Mark 16:16 (Believer’s Baptism vs. Infant Baptism): “Whoever believes and is baptized will be saved, but whoever does not believe will be condemned.” This verse is central in the debate over believer’s baptism versus infant baptism. Denominations like Baptists insist on conscious belief before baptism, contrasting with Presbyterians, Catholics, and others who support infant baptism.
  5. Acts 15:28-29 (Dietary Laws): “It seemed good to the Holy Spirit and to us not to burden you with anything beyond the following requirements: You are to abstain from food sacrificed to idols, from blood, from the meat of strangled animals…” This decision from the early Church council in Jerusalem influences discussions on Christian liberty and adherence to Old Testament laws.
  6. 1 Corinthians 5:11-13 (Church Discipline): “But now I am writing to you that you must not associate with anyone who claims to be a brother or sister but is sexually immoral or greedy…” This passage is foundational for practices of church discipline, a topic on which denominations differ, particularly in how and when to exclude a member from fellowship.
  7. Matthew 7:21-23 (Assurance of Salvation): “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven…” This passage is often discussed in the context of true faith versus nominal Christianity, impacting the theological views on assurance of salvation between denominations like Calvinists and Arminians.
  8. 2 Peter 1:20-21 (Interpretation of Scripture): “Above all, you must understand that no prophecy of Scripture came about by the prophet’s own interpretation of things.” This is often cited in discussions on the clarity and interpretation of Scripture, affecting views on personal Bible study versus authoritative interpretations by church leaders.
  9. Hebrews 10:25 (Church Attendance): “Not giving up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing, but encouraging one another…” This verse influences the emphasis different denominations place on the importance of regular church attendance and communal worship.
  10. 1 Timothy 3:2, 12 (Clergy Marriage): “Now the overseer is to be above reproach, the husband of but one wife…” This has been a key verse in discussions about whether clergy (like priests or bishops) can marry, particularly debated between the Roman Catholic Church, which requires celibacy, and Protestant denominations that allow clergy to marry.
  11. Revelation 13:16-17 (End Times Theology): “It also forced all people, great and small, rich and poor, free and slave, to receive a mark on their right hands or on their foreheads…” Interpretations of this passage vary widely and influence eschatological views, particularly concerning the nature of the “mark of the beast” and its relevance to contemporary technology or ideologies.
  12. 1 Corinthians 14:22-25 (Speaking in Tongues): “Tongues, then, are a sign, not for believers but for unbelievers…” This passage is central to Pentecostal and charismatic beliefs about the purpose and practice of speaking in tongues, contrasting with denominations that view this gift as ceased or less emphasized.
  13. Galatians 2:16 (Justification by Faith): “Know that a person is not justified by the works of the law, but by faith in Jesus Christ.” This verse underpins much of the Protestant Reformation’s emphasis on justification by faith alone, contrasting with denominational views that emphasize a synergy of faith and works.
  14. Luke 22:19-20 (The Lord’s Supper): “This is my body given for you; do this in remembrance of me.” Interpretations of this verse affect views on the Eucharist/Lord’s Supper, particularly debates over the real presence, symbolic presence, or memorial view.
  1. Matthew 5:17-20 (The Law and the Gospel): “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them.” This verse is debated concerning the relationship between the Old Testament law and New Testament grace, affecting views on moral, ceremonial, and civil law observance in Christian life.
  2. 1 Corinthians 6:9-11 (Inclusion vs. Traditionalism): “Or do you not know that wrongdoers will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived…” This verse is frequently debated in the context of discussions on LGBTQ+ inclusion within church communities.
  3. 2 Timothy 4:3-4 (Preaching and Teaching): “For the time will come when people will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear.” This verse is pivotal in discussions about doctrinal purity versus adapting messages to contemporary culture.
  4. Ephesians 5:22-23 (Marriage and Gender Roles): “Wives, submit yourselves to your own husbands as you do to the Lord.” This passage is central in debates over gender roles within marriage, influencing differing views between complementarian and egalitarian perspectives.
  5. Acts 4:32-35 (Economic Practices): “All the believers were one in heart and mind. No one claimed that any of their possessions was their own, but they shared everything they had.” This early Christian practice influences discussions on Christian community, stewardship, and socialism versus capitalism.
  6. Matthew 25:31-46 (Social Justice and Salvation): “Whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.” This passage underpins debates on the role of social justice in Christian practice and its relationship to salvation, particularly relevant in discussions about faith’s role in addressing societal issues.

 

My Reply:

Thank you for providing such good lists of Scripture passages upon which there is considerable disagreement about their proper interpretation.

I have provided the information needed to correctly resolve nearly all of the varied interpretations for these verses in either my book, The New Treasury of Scripture Knowledge, my digital resource, The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury, as well as my Real Bible Study website (use the search feature to access specific passages discussed there).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Daily Bible Nugget #854, Matthew 28:18

 

The Nugget:

Mat 28:18  And Jesus came and spake unto them, saying, All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth.

My Comment:

I placed the following comment in The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury at Matthew 28:18,

All power. Note.—Though this power is said to be given to Christ in his mediatorial capacity, to be mediatorially exercised by him as “Head over all things to the church” [Eph 1:22], it is evident that it could neither be received or exercised by any Being less than God; nor by a creature (if possible), without disparagement of the Creator (De Burgh, p. 133).

The Challenge:

“FUN FACT: Jesus was officially deified 300 years after his death, during the First Council of Nicaea, through a voting process.”

My Rebuttal:

PixelMistakePicasso, your Opening Post or Meme states:

“FUN FACT: Jesus was officially deified 300 years after his death, during the First Council of Nicaea, through a voting process.”

The Deity of Christ is taught in the New Testament and does not depend for its factuality upon the “First Council of Nicaea.”

T76
Divine attributes and prerogatives claimed and exercised by Christ and ascribed to him:

T76-1. Authority supreme. +Col 2:10.

Colossians 2:10
10  And ye are complete in him, which is the head of all principality and power:
King James Version

T76-2. Authority to see his own glory supremely. +Col 1:16. +T209, Pro 16:4. +T346, Heb 9:14.

Colossians 1:16
16  For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him:
King James Version

Proverbs 16:4
4  The LORD hath made all things for himself: yea, even the wicked for the day of evil.
King James Version

T76-3. Eternity. +*Mic 5:2.

Micah 5:2
2  But thou, Bethlehem Ephratah, though thou be little among the thousands of Judah, yet out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be ruler in Israel; whose goings forth have been from of old, from everlasting.
King James Version

T76-4. Immutability. +Heb 13:8.

Hebrews 13:8
8  Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and to day, and for ever.
King James Version

T76-5. Omnipotence. +1Co 1:24. +T218, Rev 19:6.

1 Corinthians 1:24
24  But unto them which are called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God, and the wisdom of God.
King James Version

Revelation 19:6
6  And I heard as it were the voice of a great multitude, and as the voice of many waters, and as the voice of mighty thunderings, saying, Alleluia: for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth.
King James Version

T76-6. Omnipresence. +Mat 18:20. +T220, Pro 15:3.

Matthew 18:20
20  For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.
King James Version

Proverbs 15:3
3  The eyes of the LORD are in every place, beholding the evil and the good.
King James Version

T76-7. Omniscience. +Mat 9:4. +T219, *Heb 4:13.

Matthew 9:4
4  And Jesus knowing their thoughts said, Wherefore think ye evil in your hearts?
King James Version

Hebrews 4:13
13  Neither is there any creature that is not manifest in his sight: but all things are naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom we have to do.
King James Version

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Daily Bible Nugget #853, Titus 2:13

 

The Nugget:

Tit 2:13  Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ;

The Challenge:

  1. John 17:3 and Eternal Life:

– Jesus’ prayer identifies the Father as the only true God, positioning himself as the sent one.

8. John 20:28 and Thomas’ Declaration:

– Thomas calling Jesus “My Lord and my God” can be understood as an expression of awe and recognition of divine authority bestowed upon Jesus by God.

  1. Titus 2:13 and the Appearance of Glory:

– This verse speaks to the awaited return of Jesus in glory, seen as a divine act but does not explicitly state Jesus is God.

My Rebuttal:

Very interesting post. Your proffered interpretation of the verses supporting the Deity of Christ is extremely flawed and one-sided, reflecting an Arian and Unitarian bias that fails to face the facts about what these verses teach.

Especially flawed is your understanding and interpretation of John 17:3, John 20:28, and Titus 2:13.

John 17:3 is misinterpreted by all those who fail to properly account for its context and its logic. I have dealt with this text at length on my Real Bible Study site. Place “John 17:3” in the search box to access several articles I have written.

John 20:28 is not a mere exclamation, but an explicit declaration of Who Jesus is, the climax of testimony to the Deity of Christ, the Son of God, that you might believe. Thomas directly calls Jesus “My Lord and my God.”

Titus 2:13, “Great God and our Savior Jesus Christ” is an instance of the Figure of Speech Hendiadys, where two words (here, God and Savior) are used, but one thing is meant, involving nouns. Thus God and our Savior Jesus Christ is a reference to one person, not two.

In greater depth, I cite my note as given in my book, The New Treasury of Scripture Knowledge, and my digital expansion of that resource, The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury:

Robertson notes that as early as 1798 Granville Sharp laid down a rule which has not since been successfully discredited, that when two nouns (either substantive or adjective, or participle) of the same case are connected by “and” (kai, in Greek), nouns of personal description (respecting office, dignity, affinity, or connection, and attributes, properties, or qualities, good or ill), if the article “the” in any of its cases precedes the first of the said nouns or participles, and is not repeated before the second noun or participle, the second noun always relates to the same person that is expressed or described by the first noun or participle: i.e. it denotes a farther description of the first named person.

This principle is not claimed, however, for proper names or to the plural number. Thus “the apostle and high priest of our confession” is one person, Jesus (Heb 3:1). John is referred to as “your brother, and companion” in Rev 1:9, a reference to just one person. Such expressions as “the God and Father” (Rom 15:6, 1Co 15:24, 2Co 1:3; 2Co 11:31, Gal 1:4, Eph 5:20, Php 4:20, 1Th 1:3; 1Th 3:11; 1Th 3:13, Rev 1:6) and “the Lord and Father” (Jas 1:27; Jas 3:9) are all used of one person, not two.

So likewise “the Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ” (2Pe 2:20; 2Pe 3:2) is a reference to one person. The introduction of the word “our” in 2Pe 1:11; 2Pe 3:18 does not affect the idiom.

Following the same principle for the identical construction in Greek for 2Pe 1:1, “our God and Saviour Jesus Christ” is a reference to a single person, not two.

So here at Tit 2:13, the same construction is correctly rendered “our God and Saviour Jesus Christ,” and the reference is to one person, not two.

Attention to this construction thus yields two texts in support of the Deity of Christ that were not evident in some English translations (see Robertson, The Minister and His Greek New Testament, “The Greek Article and the Deity of Christ,” pp. 61-68).

When the Greek article occurs before both nouns, two persons are meant, as “let him be unto thee as an heathen man and a publican,” two separate persons are implied (Mat 18:17, cited by William Hendrickson, Comm. on 1-2 Timothy and Titus, p. 374). Those who deny the validity of this grammatical principle are faced with the problem that if two persons are meant, then Paul is predicting the simultaneous glorious advent of both the Father and the Son at Christ’s second coming. Although the advent of the Father is supportable from other prophecies (%Dan 7:22, **Zec 14:5, *Eph 1:10), the simultaneous advent of the Father and the Son is not usually incorporated into the prophetic system of those who understand this passage to refer to two persons. +Gen 1:26, Neh 1:5; +Neh 8:6; Neh 9:32, +*Isa 9:6; Isa 19:20, Dan 2:45; Dan 9:4, *Luk 9:26, *Joh 1:1; Joh 10:30; +*Joh 20:28, +*Act 20:28, +*Rom 9:5, *Php 2:6, Col 1:15-20; *Col 2:9, 2Th 1:12 g. +*Heb 1:8, **2Pe 1:1 g. **1Jn 5:20.

 

 

 

 

 

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