The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury features explained

The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury is unique among Bible study reference resources in that it is not generic, but content-filled. It is a resource where you can find answers to your Bible questions.  When more than one point of view is supported by equally qualified, equally gifted and devoted Bible scholars, I have attempted to give the evidence each point of view marshals in its support.  I have tended to give more attention to the “minority view,” particularly when the minority view seems to have the better evidence from Scripture in its support.

Below is the Preface to my new work, The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury or UCRT.  This resource is available only from www.eStudysource.com as a Premium Module which works with the new e-Sword version 11 free Bible study software program available at www.e-Sword.net where on the top of the Home Page you will see a “Download” button. The e-Sword Bible software will run on a wide variety of platforms and devices, whether the PC, the Mac, and many portable or mobile devices. Thus my UCRT will work on all of these.

The Ultimate Cross-Reference Treasury

Prepared by

Jerome H. Smith

Copyright © 2016 by Jerome H. Smith

The Ultimate Cross-Reference Treasury is based upon The New Treasury of Scripture Knowledge Copyright © 1992 by Jerome H. Smith and Nelson’s Cross Reference Guide to the Bible © 2007 by Jerome H. Smith. Produced under arrangement with Thomas Nelson, Inc., P.O. Box 141000, Nashville, TN 37214.

The Ultimate Cross-Reference Treasury is essentially a new work, featuring vastly expanded and corrected cross references and notes.

Scripture quotations and notes marked LNT are taken from Malcolm L. Lavender, Lavender’s New Testament, A Literal Translation of the Robinson-Pierpont Majority Text (1995), © 2015 by R. L. Lavender. ISBN 978-0-9795014-7-0 Used by permission.

PREFACE

This new Bible study tool builds on my previous published works of cross references compiled for serious Bible study, The New Treasury of Scripture Knowledge, and Nelson’s Cross Reference Guide to the Bible.

Does anyone really need a still more complete work of Bible cross references than what I already produced? My personal experience is that I certainly do. I believe anyone seeking to do serious Bible study will welcome this effort to provide a new, vastly expanded, study tool for cross reference Bible study.

How is this work an improvement over what was previously provided? In no particular order, let me share just a few of the improvements I have made while expanding the cross references.

I have:

 

1. made these new references far more numerous and complete (see Psalm 80:9; Romans 15:7);

2. more carefully sorted the references given at many verses to more accurately reflect the connection to the associated keyword (see Genesis 26:24; Exodus 26:14; Leviticus 9:22; 26:6; Numbers 12:10; Deuteronomy 6:5; 29:18; 2 Samuel 7:23, 24; 2 Kings 13:21; 25:13; Job 8:13; Psalm 5:5; 34:6, 7; 74:20; 76:9; 92:4; 119:155; 140:13; Isaiah 32:17; 47:11; Ezekiel 14:11; Hosea 9:11; Matthew 9:2; Luke 5:26; 15:10; John 9:39; 10:10; 15:20; 2 Corinthians 11:31; 1 Timothy 6:1; 2 Timothy 1:14).

3. repeated references when the reference has application to more than one keyword in the verse, because often in study I am focusing on a very narrow or precisely defined subject or topic, and the connections that are really there would be missed if they are not given everywhere they apply (see 2 Th 3:2, where reference to +*Ps 32:7 is repeated at the keywords “delivered” and also “from”);

4. added many new keywords (see Leviticus 26:6; Numbers 12:10; Deuteronomy 29:18; 2 Chronicles 7:3; Job 8:13; Psalm 5:5; 38:1; Ezekiel 14:11; Luke 5:29; John 10:10; 15:20; 1 Timothy 6:1; 2 Timothy 1:14);

5. corrected many “clipped” or orphaned references (see at Ezekiel 23:32 thou shalt be laughed reference to Psalm 79:3 which is only relevant when reference to Psalm 79:4 is included with it; at Ezekiel 20:13 to consume reference to Deuteronomy 32:27 is clarified greatly by supplying Deuteronomy 32:26 with it; so likewise at Habakkuk 1:16 they reference to Ezekiel 28:3 which lacks relevance without including Ezekiel 28:4; similarly, Deuteronomy 26:18 reference to Ezekiel 36:25-27 has been corrected to read Ezekiel 36:25-28; at Luke 1:25 hath reference to Genesis 30:22 should have read Genesis 30:22, 23 since it is verse 23 that is relevant, a frequent occurrence from the arbitrary cutting of references in the original Treasury of Scripture Knowledge; at Acts 18:6 unto the Gentiles is clarified by adding Acts 19:9 so as to read Acts 19:8, 9; and so forth);

6. corrected many errors in the cross-references, so that it should be almost impossible for any intensive user of these references to encounter any more printing mistakes;

7. added many unique cross references never provided before in previous published material (see 2 Chronicles 6:37; Psalm 98:2; Luke 5:29), references discovered in my own study of the Bible during the nearly 25 years since the publication of The New Treasury of Scripture Knowledge;

8. provided as many reciprocal references as could be found, given the time available to me (now six full years, and according to my notes, more than 2016 full days of study, morning, afternoon, and evening!). I have often thought life is too short for one person to create this even more complete study tool—but this tool is likely more complete than any similar work previously produced. The initial motivation to begin this work stems from requests made by students of the Bible asking for more references, specifically references to the Old Testament to be given for verses in the New Testament, especially for the Sermon on the Mount as given in Matthew 5—7. I am sure I have fulfilled that request, and much more.

9. provided a full enumeration of the provisions of the Abrahamic (Genesis 12:2) and Davidic (2 Samuel 7:10) Covenants and greatly expanded cross references for each provision. In studying Mr. George N. H. Peters’ work, The Theocratic Kingdom, I was motivated to study these great covenants even further in response to Peters’ well-founded Bible study suggestion in Volume 1, page 285, under “Proposition 46: The Kingdom anticipated by the Jews at the First Advent is based on the Abrahamic and Davidic Covenants.” In a paragraph under Observation 1, Peters states: “Indeed, it is universally admitted, however explained afterward, that the covenants are the proper basis of future Revelation, and that they contain in an epitomized form the substance of God’s Purpose in reference to man’s Salvation, the Messiah’s Kingdom and glory, and the perfected Redemption from the curse. Hence, men of all shades of opinion agreeing in this matter, it is essential for any one who desires to become a real student of God’s Word to make himself familiar with these covenants, seeing, that, in the nature of the case, all things following must correspond fully with these previously given pledges and guides.”

10. greatly expanded the references to the Figures of Speech (see, for example, Genesis 8:22, FS148, the Figure Polysyndeton, or “Many Ands,” where many more references are given);

11. added many more examples of cause/effect relationship verses to the listing at Psalm 9:10;

12. added many significant new entries in the Subject Index (see, for example, the entries for “general call,” “effectual call,” “prevenient grace,” “TULIP” and its subcategories explaining this acronym and the full Scriptural documentation for each subcategory);

13. corrected the Name Index, so it should now be a perfectly complete listing of Bible names as they appear in the King James or Authorized Version, including the Translators’ marginal readings and renderings;

14. increased by several times over the number of entries in the Greek Strong Number Index; I did this to meet the need of missionaries I have heard from who complained that when they tried to follow the cross references in the original Greek they did not seem to properly relate to each other as they did in an English translation; I have placed the cross references to the original language separately from the usual subject cross references familiar to English users so that either study purpose is easy to follow.

15. Added new enumerated studies on the Attributes of God (Genesis 18:25); the Angel of Jehovah (Genesis 22:15); the names and titles of the Antichrist (Micah 5:5); and by the gracious full permission of Dr. Malcolm L. Lavender and his son Dr. R. L. Lavender, given additional notes and grammatical discussions to provide deeper, more accurate insight into the doctrine of the Atonement of Christ throughout the New Testament, from their just published (2016) Lavender’s New Testament (LNT), A Literal Translation of the Robinson-Pierpont Majority Text (1995), for which by invitation I wrote the Preface.

16. Expanded my notes on the Rules of Interpretation at 2 Peter 1:20, furnishing for some of the rules reference to specific examples of their proper application.

17. Restored all the notes given in Bagster’s original study Bible, The Comprehensive Bible (prepared in 1826), the source of all the original cross references and notes in the Treasury of Scripture Knowledge (prepared in 1834): I have restored the full notes where the original Treasury editors arbitrarily “truncated” them, and I have restored the many notes which were left out altogether; I have restored the original bibliographical documentation for these notes as given in The Comprehensive Bible. These notes are always identified by a preceding “Note:” designation.

18. Included a new and corrected Notes Index from The Comprehensive Bible for its claimed 4000 notes.

19. Restored British spelling for keywords to conform more precisely to the King James Version (KJV), also called the Authorized Version (AV), as well as the notes;

20. Furnished new notes culled from over five years of my active participation on Internet forums where I provided careful answers to Bible questions, or developed apologetic material in defense of truly Biblical doctrine in answer to the claims and objections of those who support mistaken theological positions.

21. Expanded the major discussion of how to study the Bible at an extensive note newly written for Hebrews 6:9.

 

I continue to key this major reference work to the King James Version (KJV), also known as the Authorized Version (AV), because this English version of the Bible does not undergo further revision as many modern English translations do. That way, the keywords given in this resource continue to match the stable text of the KJV/AV accurately.

The cross references given in this resource will work just fine with any Bible translation.

There are many I must not forget to thank for the varied help, motivation, inspiration, or instruction they have given as I have prepared this new Bible study tool. I would like to mention in particular Dr. David Thomason who first encouraged me in this new work, providing me access to more digital resources and helping me determine the scope of this project; to other now unnamed individuals in an Internet discussion who voiced a strong interest in having access to a far more complete system of cross references, which at long last I have now provided. I must extend special thanks to Mr. Ken Sagely who furnished me many books from his personal library, which have proved of continuing help. I must also thank Dr. Malcolm L. Lavender and his son Dr. R. L. Lavender who taught me much as they asked for my editorial help on the many books they have written over the years, and for granting full permission to use their works in this project. Dr. W. L. Wade, pastor of the Lighthouse Bible Church in Danville, Virginia and Pastor Scott Cheatham in Denver, Colorado have both been an inspiration for this work as they have shared with me their own interest in cross-reference Bible study, and Pastor Edward Barclay of Hope Baptist Church, Loveland, Colorado for invaluable help received. I owe my plumber, Mr. Duane Froh, thanks for introducing me to the e-Sword Bible software and for asking good Bible questions which motivated my further study (see Hebrews 13:4). I must also thank Mr. Phil Stoner and Mr. Rick Meyers for their encouragement to pursue this work. My brother Martin A. Smith encouraged my study of many areas of Bible doctrine I might have utterly missed. I must not forget to thank my mother-in-law, Mrs. Grace Opificius, who read and approved my notes, checked many of my cross references, and by diligent searching added a few good references beyond what I found when I needed more help (see Job 5:15). Last but by no means least, I must thank my wife Susanne for her continued encouragement and her patience with the long hours I’ve expended to produce this work, and to my sons Tim and Dan who have kept my computer and software functioning for many years.

 

Jerome H. Smith

 

SYMBOLS AND ABBREVIATIONS

The following symbols and abbreviations used in this work are important to understand to get the most benefit from its helpful features. An explanation of each symbol follows:

 

*    placed before a cross reference marks a very clear reference where the connection is usually immediately obvious. Beginning users are encouraged to use these references first. As more experience is gained, all the references may be consulted. Another important benefit of this emphasis marking is that when teaching a group and time is limited, these references are the most helpful to consider when time will not permit consulting them all.

**    placed before a cross reference indicates a critically clear very significant reference which should not be missed.

+    This symbol means “find more here” and marks where more references can be found at another main reference point on the same subject; also may mark where a set of references to the underlying Greek or Hebrew word is located, and for names, where the main entry for the name is to be found. Following this symbol three layers deep in the cross references will lead to a very full study, what I call “digging deeper.” After reading the cross-references given for a verse, dig deeper by following where the references marked by the + symbol lead. The “first layer” involves following the references given at the starting passage marked “+” by reading the cross references given for each at those passages; the second layer involves following where the cross references marked with the “+” at each of those second layer passages that the second layer + symbol leads to; the third layer involves following all the “+” references given that the third layer verses with the + sign lead to. After this much study you will have covered the related subjects very thoroughly. I have placed a detailed step-by-step explanation of this Bible study method at the end of the note at Hebrews 6:9 in a section titled “How to dig deeper using cross reference Bible study” giving a specific example to study 2 Corinthians 5:17 this way. This process of following where successive “+” symbols lead will also work to find a verse you know is “somewhere” when you cannot recall any specific words from the verse so a concordance cannot be used to find it: just find any verse in the Bible that has anything to do with the subject, and usually using the above process of following the + symbol will get you to the desired verse fairly quickly.

+*    marks where still more references on this subject or topic are located.

*+    marks a clear reference which also serves as a main reference point.

+**    marks either a very thorough collection of references or a set of references which are potentially of life-changing significance or otherwise most important to read.

%    marks a reference which contrasts in some way, perhaps another aspect of the subject, or a reference to the opposite subject.

=    marks a type or an antitype. A type is a picture in the Old Testament which is fulfilled in some way by a person, thing, or event in the New Testament. An antitype is the New Testament person, thing, or event which fulfills the picture in the Old Testament (see John 19:36).

=>    type or antitype identified on Biblical authority (see 1 Corinthians 5:7).

>    marks quotations in the New Testament from the Old Testament as well as at Old Testament passages the fact that they are quoted in the New Testament, and sometimes where the Old Testament or the New Testament quotes itself.

<a    marks an allusion to another Old or New Testament passage (1 Tim 6:7).

<rp    identifies quotations from the Pentateuch in the prophets (see Isaiah 1:2).

$    identifies references which mark the fulfillment of prophecy.

#    indicates a strict parallel passage, as in the Gospels, or the books of Samuel, Kings, and Chronicles. Parallel texts in Proverbs are also marked. These have not been noted exhaustively, but only selectively.

S#    marks a reference to a Strong’s Concordance lexical entry number for Hebrew or Greek words.

*S#    placed before a Strong’s number (*S# H2312) indicates that all the occurrences of the original Hebrew or Greek word so marked are given here.

+S#    placed before a Strong’s number (+S# G2313) indicates that all the occurrences to the Hebrew or Greek word which are relevant or parallel to the use there are given.

()    When a cross-reference in a figure-of-speech listing is placed in parentheses, this indicates that the figure is not apparent in English versions (KJV, YLT = Young’s Literal Translation, or Rotherham’s Emphasized Bible) and so is not cross-referenced back to the explanation of the figure at the passage so listed.

()    In a series of references to a Hebrew or Greek word identified by its Strong’s number, the English translation is given in parentheses when the word is rendered differently in a particular reference.

()    An English word in parentheses after a verse reference lets the reader know which word in the verse translates the same underlying Hebrew or Greek word even when the Strong’s number is not given.

()    A word placed in parentheses in connection with the figure of speech Ellipsis indicates the word is not present in the original language, but is to be supplied in accordance with the figure of speech as indicated.

[ ]    Brackets enclose references to the original Greek words to separate verbal references to the original language word from the normal subject-related cross-references.

A.M.    Anno Mundi, in Bible chronology, the year from the creation of Adam (see Ge 4:3).

An.Ex.Is.    In Bible chronology, years since the exodus of Israel from Egypt (see Jsh 15:1).

B.C.    In chronology, the year before Christ.

BDBG    The New Brown, Driver, Briggs Gesenius Hebrew Aramaic English Lexicon.

CB    Companion Bible. This scholarly resource has been used carefully with reserve because of its editor’s materialistic theology and hyper-dispensational theology. See Ps 16:10n.

EGT    Expositor’s Greek Testament.

F/L    In the book of Isaiah, sets of references to “first” (Isaiah chapters 1—39) and “last” (Isaiah chapters 40—66) portions of Isaiah are given to demonstrate the unity of the book. Words alleged by some authorities to occur in only the first portion of the book are seen to be used in the latter portion, demonstrating that the book is the work of a single author.

FS    Figures of speech are identified with a reference number, such as FS148 (see Ge 8:22), followed by the name of the figure of speech in the main entry, or a reference to where that figure is explained, and to where all the other instances of that particular figure, or subset of that figure, can be found. This feature is an essential aid to Bible interpretation. This is the first time that such information has been made readily accessible to the ordinary Bible reader in one resource. The Companion Bible identifies many of the figures of speech in its margins, and has an alphabetical list of the figures with brief definitions in its Appendix 6. However, users of the Companion Bible who come across an important instance of the use of a figure of speech are not led in that volume to the other instances of its use. But to learn to identify a figure when it is used, one needs to see it in many contexts until one has developed a “feel” for the figure, and can learn its characteristics well enough to be able to identify it wherever it occurs. Of course, one can consult E. W. Bullinger’s Figures of Speech Used in the Bible, but there are many instances given in the margins of the Companion Bible which are not listed or discussed in that book, and many instances given in the book which are not given in the Companion Bible. This new resource remedies that, and furnishes additional references to the figures not found in either of those two excellent sources. It is believed that this new resource is the most comprehensive listing of the figures of speech in the Bible ever produced in English.

FS1—180    The names of the figures of speech have been alphabetized and given reference numbers from 1 to 180. Often the reference number is followed by additional letters and numbers to clearly identify the category or subcategory of the figure of speech. The full alphabetical list of the figures with the subcategories is given in the Figures of Speech Index.

F/S    F/S 542 means a reference is made to page 542 of E. W. Bullinger’s Figures of Speech Used in the Bible (see at Numbers 11:17, keyword spirit, for FS121A3, Metonymy of the Cause). All main figure of speech entries are so keyed to Bullinger’s volume.

FWG    F. W. Grant

g or h    Indicates verbal references to the same Hebrew or Greek words when used after a cross-reference. After a Strong’s number, indicates whether the number refers to the Hebrew or Greek lexicon at the back of Strong’s Concordance.

Gr.    Greek

Heb.    Hebrew

ISBE    International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1929, 1939, 1960)

JFB    Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown, Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible.

lit.    Literally

LNT    Lavender’s New Testament, A Literal Translation of the Robinson-Pierpont Majority Text (1995), by Malcolm L. Lavender, © 2015 by R. L. Lavender. ISBN 978-0-9795014-7-0 Used by permission.

mg    A reference to the marginal reading in the center column of many editions of the King James or Authorized Version of the Bible. If preceded by an Italicized or, the reading or rendering is that furnished by the KJV translators; if preceded by an unitalicized “or,” the suggested alternate reading is from another source.

MM    James Hope Moulton and George Milligan, The Vocabulary of the Greek Testament.

note    Placed after a cross-reference (Ge 2:7n) means that there is a pertinent note at that reference in this work about the subject of the reference. These notes are of great importance. Four thousand of the notes are drawn from Bagster’s Comprehensive Bible and are now also indexed alphabetically in the Notes Index, available to modern readers in this new resource for the first time. This new feature employing the “n” symbol, now greatly extended, makes the many notes throughout this resource far more accessible than in previous editions, and provides a unique internal cross referencing system for the notes.

 

or,    Italicized “or,” identifies a marginal reading supplied by the translators of the Authorized or King James Version.

or,    Unitalicized “or,” identifies alternate renderings supplied by this editor from Robert Young’s Literal Translation and its accompanying Concise Critical Comments, and other sources.

S#    There are selected references to the lexicon numbers of Strong’s Concordance throughout this resource, so relating information given here to other published Bible study tools keyed to Strong’s Concordance. Consult the Strong’s Number Indexes at the end of this resource.

T    Topic Numbers are furnished in this resource, together with an important index to these topics, to give this resource all the advantages of a topical Bible or topical arrangement of the Scriptures. Sometimes the full set of references for more than one topic is keyed to the same verse. To assist the user to more rapidly identify the appropriate set of references, the topic numbers are given at each major collection of indexed topical references.

TDNT    Theological Dictionary of the New Testament

 

w    ”with.” This symbol is used whenever cross-references are listed out of their normal biblical sequence in order to show important relationships between passages. These relationships would be lost if references were always cited only in their biblical order. Normally, however, references are cited in their biblical order, excepting that references are first given to the same chapter, then to the same biblical book. All other references are cited in turn in biblical order. It is a sound rule of interpretation to seek first to understand the meaning of the language of an author by reference to the use of the same or similar language in the same book. The use of the abbreviation “w” has been reduced in this resource by more often spelling out “with” in full.

WKF    Walter Kelly Firminger, The Epistles of St. Paul the Apostle to the Colossians and to Philemon with Introduction and Notes.

x    placed after a topic number indicates the topic provides a set of proof texts used to support a false doctrine. The importance of including selected references of this category cannot be overestimated. Such reference sets furnish the Bible-believing Christian with a defense against false doctrines promulgated by what are sometimes known as “false cults.” Thus, by means of these symbols you can learn the commonly cited proof texts used to support a mistaken interpretation, and by reference to the cross-references not so marked, and especially by reference to cross-references marked with a % or “contrast” symbol, the reader can learn the biblical answer to many of the false positions of the cults. Such helpful sets of cross-references are now marked out for the user more fully in this resource than in any other single reference source available.

x    x or ? placed before or sometimes after a cross-reference indicates doubtful validity of the reference, for it is a wrong identification of the source of a quotation (see Re 15:6), or it is a proof text underlying a mistaken doctrinal (Ge 3:15. Ga 6:15) or prophetic interpretation (Re 4:1), or it is a questionable identification of a figure of speech, questionable because it is misidentified (Ge 1:26n), or arbitrarily supports a mistaken (Ge 24:10n) viewpoint.

YLT    Young’s Literal Translation of the Bible.

 

I should add a note here as to where to find the new “Notes Index.”  It will be found in the e-Sword “Reference Library” under the title The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury. There will be found the Bibliography, Names Index, Notes Index, Prayer Index, Proverbs Index.

The Subject Index and the Topic Index will be found in the lower left quadrant window pane of the e-Sword program devoted to Dictionaries, and will open when you click the “tab” labeled “UCTR Indexes.” Other indexes are there too, including the Figure of Speech Index, the most complete index to figures of speech found in the Bible there is.

It is a good idea to “browse” the Subject Index and the Topic Index.  You will discover many topics you would otherwise never imagine or discover otherwise.  They would provide any Bible reader a lifetime of information to glean from Bible study that might otherwise be missed.

This entry was posted in Bible Study Tools and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury features explained

  1. Phil Johnson says:

    I absolutely love this resource. I have had _The *New* Treasury of Scripture Knowledge_ in book form since it was published in the 1990s, and I’ve always wished I could access it electronically. The Bible Study software I always turn to first is eSword. Of course it comes equipped with the original _Treasury of Scripture Knowledge_–but having used _The *New* Treasury_, I wanted the rest of those cross references. This expanded and improved version more than answers that need. Thanks for the labor you have invested in it–especially given the long commitment required to develop a work like this.

  2. Jerry says:

    Thank you, Phil, for your kind comments.

    The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury is now far more complete than my Treasury of Scripture Knowledge.

    I use it myself!

    If you ever have a question about this new resource, just post it here.

    My concern is that there must be many people who love the Bible who would enjoy using this Bible study tool, but have never heard of it.

    My hope and prayer is that those who use it will share the news and encourage others to do likewise.

  3. Steve Williams says:

    I can’t seem to locate the Subject Index alluded to in the documentation. Where exactly can I find it?

  4. Steve Williams says:

    Please disregard my previous email. Found it under the Dictionaries. Duh!

  5. Jerry says:

    Dear Steve,

    The Subject Index appears in the e-Sword’s program under the Dictionaries Window panel in the lower right hand corner or quadrant of e-Sword.

    Just “click” on the tab, “UCRT Indexes,” and you will see the Subject Index entries there displayed in a column at the right hand side of that quadrant dictionaries window.

    I know you let me know you already found out how to find the Subject Index, but I wrote an answer for the benefit of others who may read here too.

    Thank you for your good question. As the Lord leads, let others know about this Bible study tool.

    Should you ever have any further questions, just ask!

  6. Steven says:

    Hi Jerry,

    I may be being a little dense here, but I’m having problems figuring out how the topical index is supposed to be used (in the e-Sword version). Is one meant to memorize what the numbers stand for, or is there some way to search the index for a particular topic? For example, T31 ff. deal with baptism. Would you navigate to these by clicking on a reference to T31 (or T32, etc.) in the commentary section on a verse, then explore nearby topics in the index? Is that the idea?

    Also, I’m curious why some of the time clicking a Figure of Speech takes you to the first instance of that FoS in the index (e.g., clicking on FS144A3 in the commentary on Ephesians 3:5 takes you to FS144A1 in the index), while other times, it takes you to that specific subcategorization (e.g., clicking on FS63C in the commentary on Ephesians 4:29 takes you straight to FS63C in the index rather than FS63A1). Is there a pattern to this that has escaped my attention, or is it inconsistent?

    Finally, I use Accordance, Logos, and BibleWorks more than e-Sword, and have more resources in these programs (particularly in the original languages department). Are there plans to get UCRT implemented in these programs at some point?

    Thanks!

    -Steven

  7. Jerry says:

    Dear Steven,

    My apologies for not getting back to you on this sooner. Now that summer is here, there is so much work to do both inside and outside that I have not spent much time on my computer.

    The Topic Number Index is designed to bring together related topics that would not be seen when only listed in an alphabetical index.

    For the first 750 numbered topics, I derived those from a work written in the nineteenth century, so the arrangement is not strictly mine. I utilized this resource because it enabled me to get a head start on creating an alphabetical subject index for the New Treasury of Scripture Knowledge.

    As an aside, I will say that there is more on the subject of baptism in The New Treasury of Scripture Knowledge and now this new electronic edition created for e-Sword, The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury, than you are likely to find in any other printed or electronic resource.

    For example, T39 has two subdivisions:

    T39-1. Passages referred to by those who immerse. Romans 6:4.

    T39-2. Passages referred to by those who sprinkle or pour. Hebrews 10:22. T31, Mark 7:4. T620, Psalms 72:6.

    In conjunction with these two contrasting positions regarding the mode of baptism, I have placed extensive notes throughout the Old Testament and the New Testament. These are readily found by following the cross references at either Romans 6:4 and its extensive note arguing for immersion, and at the Hebrews 10:22 reference where the cross references will lead to the passages used to support the mode of sprinkling or pouring.

    At Romans 6:4 I have marked Colossians 2:12 with a double asterisk, for this is a most important parallel to Romans 6:4. If you go to Colossians 2:12, you will find a note that presents the contrasting set of arguments for non-immersion. Many additional passages and related notes on this subject are given there.

    As for how those Figure of Speech links work, by clicking on the red-colored FS144A3 designation, it takes you to the first of the FS144A numbers. That must be how Rick Meyers programmed this when he created the module. I think it has its usefulness, in that it goes to the first example of the Figure of Speech in that general category. But from Ephesians 3:5 itself, you are taken to Genesis 11:5, the main entry for that Figure of Speech subcategory, where the figure is named and explained, and other instances of the figure for that precise subcategory are listed. I also provide the link to Bullinger’s Figures of Speech Used in the Bible, page 408, the primary source for the information I have provided.

    I believe the way I have set this up in the New Treasury of Scripture Knowledge, and now in my revision and expansion of that work in The Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury, you have the most complete listing of the Figures of Speech used in the Bible that there is.

    I appreciate your good questions!

    If you have additional questions, please ask. I’ll get to them eventually, Lord willing and enabling.

  8. Is there a reason this is exclusive to eSword and not being made available for other Bible software companies to use? I love the Treasury & would love to use this resource in my preferred Bible apps.

  9. Jerry says:

    At the present time the Ultimate Cross Reference Treasury is exclusively available through eStudysource for use with the e-Sword free Bible software.

    My initial discussions seemed to indicate my resource would be made available in the future for other Bible study platforms, so this may happen in the future.

    At the present time I believe my contract makes no explicit provision for this eventuality.

    In the meantime, I have been upgrading this resource for my own personal use here as I do further Bible study. Should my Bible study resource become available for other platforms in the future, I am hoping my latest improvements will be included.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Connect with Facebook

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.